Skip to main content

Nicolas Stettler Fotografie

Rain cover for your camera: How to protect your camera properly

  • Datum Veröffentlichung: 25.11.2020
  • Titel: How to protect your camera in the rain?
  • Text Snippet: In this article I show you how to protect your camera in the rain. I will show you different methods, like making your own rain cover or buying one on the internet.
  • Foto:
  • erstes Foto:

How to protect your camera in the rain?

Rain can give a photo a very special atmosphere. But although most cameras are water resistant, there is always a certain risk in taking the camera out of the backpack in the rain.

How can you protect your camera from rain? Various manufacturers offer rain covers for your camera. With a bit of skill you can also make your own rain cover. You can protect your camera from rain as follows:

  • Regularly wipe the camera and the lens with a cloth
  • Use an umbrella
  • Make a rain cover yourself
  • Buy a rain cover for your camera

Why you should protect your camera from rain

Unlike most smartphones today, DSLR's and system cameras are not waterproof. Many cameras are dust and spray water proof, but no camera would survive a heavy rain shower or even a fall into water.

But this is not only due to the lens bayonet, which allows changing the lens, but also to all the buttons and connectors of the camera. Most of the buttons actually have a seal to prevent water from running into the camera. But these are only useful against smaller water drops.

If water actually gets into the camera body, it can cause a short circuit. This in turn can damage the camera hardware.

This is especially bad if salt water gets into the housing. Because salt water conducts electricity better, short circuits occur even faster. If the water dries, salt residues remain. This in turn is aggressive and can lead to rust inside the camera.

So you see, water can do a lot to your camera. But how can you protect the camera from this? Quite simply. Namely a rain cover. There are many of these on the Internet. You can also make one yourself.

Weatherproofing the camera

As already mentioned, many of the cameras and lenses are now weatherproof. To a certain extent, the attached seals may keep the rain out. In light rain, the internal camera seal is sufficient and nothing should happen. In general it is always better to be careful.

In light rain I don't mount the rain cover most of the time. Since I have an additional lens coat on the lens, the drops are absorbed by the cloth and do not endanger the lens. If you don't have a raincoat, you can wipe the drops on the camera and the lens regularly with a cloth.

Of course you can easily use an umbrella. This works very well for example in landscape photography. But if you want to take pictures of animals the umbrella is useless. The heavy equipment makes it impossible to hold another umbrella. Additionally the umbrella is very conspicuous and could scare away many animals.

As soon as it starts to rain more heavily and drops start to form on the lens, I mount my rain cover. There are many umbrellas for cameras on the internet. But you can also make your own rain cover.

The RainCoat by Lenscoat protects the camera from rain, snow and hail.

Investing in a good system to protect your expensive equipment is definitely recommended!

DIY camera rain cover

Plastic bags are quite suitable as rain protection due to their impermeability. If you cut a hole into a plastic bag you can easily make a rain cover. For this you need:

  • Plastic bag
  • Adhesive tape (duct tape)
  • Elastic bands or elastic band (big enough to fit around the lens)
  • Scissors

First you have to cut a hole on the bottom of the plastic bag. This hole should be just large enough to fit over the lens. Now you have to reinforce the opening with tape. Without this step, the bag will quickly tear or expand.

To make sure that the rain bag fits well over the lens you can either put some rubber bands over it or attach an elastic band of the size of the lens to the plastic bag.

The homemade rain cover is now already finished. You can also add an opening for your right hand. Again, you would have to reinforce the opening with tape.

Because the rain cover is made of plastic, it reflects a lot of light. It is also quite loud in windy conditions. This can be disturbing for the animals. That's why I replaced my self-made rain cover with a RainCoat a couple of years ago. It is a bit more expensive, but in return it is of high quality and very well thought out.

The rain cover from Lenscoat

The company Lenscoat offers different (rain) covers for your camera. All of them work in the same way and are made of the same waterproof material. Available in different sizes, the raincoats are perfectly adapted to your camera and lens. The RainCoat is available in the sizes Small, Medium and Large. Furthermore, the raincoats can be bought in different colours and with different camouflage.

The raincover on my camera.

The camera is accessable via an extra opening. This opening is only available in the Standard and Pro variants of the lenscoat.

The different models

RainCoat Small

The rain cover in the size Small is recommended exclusively for landscape photographers. With a length of about 30 cm, the rain cover protects cameras with lenses of a focal length up to about 70 mm.

RainCoat Medium

With the size medium, lenses such as a 70-200 mm or a 80-400 mm can be protected from the rain. The rain cover has a length of about 43 cm.

RainCoat Large

The rain cover in the size Large has a length of 58 cm. This rain cover fits for example a 300mm 2.8.

RainCoat Pro/ Standard

In addition Lenscoat also offers 4 more raincoats. These are even bigger and are long enough for a 600mm f/4 and have one or two entrances to make the operation of the 4 raincoats easier. The RainCoat Pro and RainCoat Standard have an opening on the right side of the camera. This allows you to take normal photos and still protect the entire camera from the rain. Without this sleeve, you have to pull back the RainCoat to operate the camera.

The RainCoat 2 Standard and RainCoat 2 Pro have an additional sleeve on the lens. This makes it possible to turn the zoom ring or focus ring on the lens even with the RainCoat.

But what is the difference between the Standard and Pro? In the Pro version, this rain cover is slightly larger than the RainCoat large. At 77 cm, the rain cover is sufficient for practically all telephoto lenses. If this is really not enough, an extension is also provided.

At 52 cm, the Standard version is somewhat shorter than the RainCoat Large. No extension is supplied either.

Quality

The rain covers from Lenscoat are all of very high quality. I have owned the same RainCoat for years and it still does its job like on the first day. All seams are well sewn. The fabric is waterproof and has a good quality.

The RainCoat can be adjusted to fit your equipment with various velcro fasteners and a drawstring. For example, the RainCoat can be attached to the sun visor with a Velcro fastener. Two additional Velcro fasteners help to keep the RainCoat compact on the lens. With the pull cord, the opening towards the camera can be enlarged or reduced. This allows the opening to be made so small that only the viewfinder is visible.

The sleeves can each be folded and stored in a sewn-on pocket with a Velcro fastener. In this pocket there is also another small pocket in which e.g. a battery can be stored. I always leave the sleeves open, because I want to operate the camera with my right hand.

In addition to the RainCoat there is a small pocket in which it can be stored.

The fabric of the RainCoat is waterproof. Therefore your camera will be safe even in the rain.

The fabric of the RainCoat is waterproof. Therefore your camera will be safe even in heavy rain.

Recommendation

A rain cover is a must for every nature photographer. Whether you want to make a rain cover yourself or buy one is up to you. I myself used a plastic bag as rain protection in the past. Since I bought the RainCoat, I could not imagine using a plastic bag anymore.

I recommend that you buy a rain cover. I have been using the rain cover from Lenscoat for several years. It has already accompanied me in the wildest autumn storms or protected my camera in hurricanes on the sandy beach.

Compared to a homemade rain cover, the RainCoat works much more reliable, is easier to install and is also a lot more durable. Because the RainCoat is made of fabric, it does not reflect light. In windy conditions, the RainCoat is also much quieter than a plastic bag. Furthermore, the RainCoat has a camouflage effect in a camouflage pattern. This also reduces the chances that an animal will notice you and leave.

You want to get a rain cover too? In the following table, I have summarized my recommendations for various equipment. The links are affiliate links and will lead you to the Lenscoat website. If you buy an item through my link, I will receive a small commission. But for you the price does not change.

RainCoat Small

30 cm             24-70 f/2.8

Buy
RainCoat Medium

43 cm             70-200 f/2.8; 80-400 f/4.5-5.6

Buy
RainCoat Large

58 cm             300 f/2.8

Buy
RainCoat Standard

52 cm             300 f/2.8

Buy
RainCoat Pro

77 cm             600 f/4; 800 f/5.6

Buy
RainCoat 2 Standard

52 cm             300 f/2.8

Buy
RainCoat 2 Pro

77 cm             600 f/4; 800 f/5.6

Buy

You might also find interesting:

  • Bird Photography - Create impressive images

    Photographing birds can be very difficult. In this article you will learn how to create impressive and unique pictures of birds. I explain what you should pay attention to when taking pictures and where you can find birds that you can easily photograph. Learn from my tips and tricks, which I myself have learned in the last years while photographing.

    Read more

  • The 11 most common ducks in Switzerland

    Many ducks overwinter here in Switzerland. But how can you identify them. In this article, I'll talk about the most common ducks in Switzerland. You'll learn where they live and how you can identify them.

    Read more

Regenschutz für deine Kamera: So schützt du deine Kamera richtig

  • Datum Veröffentlichung: 25.11.2020
  • Titel: Wie schütze ich die Kamera im Regen?
  • Text Snippet: In diesem Artikel zeige ich dir, wie du deine Kamera im Regen schützen kannst. Dabei zeige ich dir verschiedene Methoden, wie z.B. einen Regenschutz selber zu basteln oder im Internet zu kaufen.
  • Foto:
  • erstes Foto:

Wie schütze ich die Kamera im Regen?

Regen kann einem Foto eine ganz besondere Stimmung verleihen. Doch obwohl die allermeisten Kameras spritzwassergeschützt sind, ist doch immer ein gewisses Risiko dabei, die Kamera im Regen aus dem Rucksack zu nehmen.

Wie schütze ich die Kamera im Regen? Verschiedene Hersteller bieten Regenschütze für deine Kamera an. Mit etwas Handgeschick kannst du aber auch deinen eigenen Regenschutz basteln. Die Kamera kannst du grundsätzlich folgendermassen vor Regen schützen:

  • Regelmässig die Kamera und das Objektiv mit einem Tuch abwischen
  • Einen Regenschirm benutzen
  • Einen Regenschutz selber basteln
  • Einen Regenschutz für deine Kamera kaufen

Warum du deine Kamera vor Regen schützen solltest

Im Gegensatz zu den meisten Smartphones heutzutage sind System- und Spiegelreflexkameras nicht wasserdicht. So sind viele Kameras zwar Staub- und Spritzwassergeschütz, einen heftigen Regenschauer oder gar ein Fall ins Wasser würde keine Kamera überleben.

Das liegt aber nicht nur am Objektivbajonett, welches das Wechseln des Objektivs erlaubt, sondern auch an all den Knöpfen und Anschlüssen der Kamera. Die allermeisten Knöpfe haben eigentlich eine Abdichtung, um zu verhindern, dass Wasser in die Kamera laufen. Doch diese sind nur gegen kleinere Wassertropfen von Nutzen.

Gelangt tatsächlich Wasser ins Kameragehäuse kann es zu einem Kurzschluss kommen. Dies wiederum kann die Hardware der Kamera beschädigen.

Besonders schlimm ist dies, wenn Salzwasser ins Gehäuse gelangt. Da Salzwasser Strom besser leitet kommt es noch schneller zu Kurzschlüssen. Trocknet das Wasser bleiben Salzrückstände. Dies wiederum wirkt aggressiv und kann zu Rost im Innern der Kamera führen.

Du siehst also, Wasser kann deiner Kamera ganz schön viel anhaben. Doch wie kannst du die Kamera davor schützen? Ganz einfach. Nämlich einem Regenschutz. Davon gibt es im Internet ganz viele. Allenfalls kannst du auch selber einen Basteln.

Wetterfestigkeit der Kamera

Wie bereits erwähnt, sind viele der Kameras und Objektive heute spritzwassergeschützt. Bis zu einem gewissen Grad mögen die angebrachten Dichtungen den Regen abhalten. Bei leichtem Regen genügt die Kamerainterne Dichtung und es sollte nichts passieren. Generell ist es natürlich immer besser vorsichtig zu sein.

Bei leichtem Regen montiere ich selber aber den Regenschutz nicht unbedingt. Da ich zusätzlich einen Lenscoat am Objektiv habe, werden die Tropfen vom Stoff aufgesogen und gefährden das Objektiv nicht. Wer keinen Regenschutz besitzt, kann die Tropfen auf der Kamera und dem Objektiv regelmässig mit einem Tuch abwischen.

Natürlich kann man ganz einfach einen Regenschirm benutzen. Das funktioniert z.B. bei der Landschaftsfotografie sehr gut. Will man aber Tiere fotografieren ist der Regenschirm aber unbrauchbar. Die schwere Ausrüstung macht es unmöglich, noch einen Regenschirm zu halten. Zusätzlich ist der Regenschirm sehr auffällig und könnte viele Tiere verscheuchen.

Sobald es stärker zu regnen beginnt und sich Tropfen montiere ich deshalb meinen Regenschutz. Regenschütze für Kameras gibt es im Internet sehr viele. Allerdings kannst du auch selber einen Regenschutz basteln.

Der RainCoat an meiner Kamera.

Es ist stark zu empfehlen, in einen Regenschutz für die teure Foto-Ausrüstung zu investieren.

DIY-Kameraregenschutz

Plastiksäcke sind durch ihre Dichtigkeit recht gut als Regenschutz geeignet. Schneidest du ein Lock in einen Plastiksack kannst du dir ganz simpel einen Regenschutz basteln. Dazu brauchst du:

  • Plastiksack
  • Klebeband (Ductape)
  • Gummibänder oder Gummizug (genug gross, um rund ums Objektiv zu passen)
  • Schere

Zuerst musst du auf der Unterseite des Plastiksacks ein Loch ausschneiden. Dieses sollte genau so gross sein, dass es über das Objektiv passt. Mit Klebeband musst du nun die Öffnung verstärken. Ohne diesen Schritt wird der Sack schnell einreissen oder sich ausweiten.

Damit der Regensack gut am Objektiv hält kannst du entweder ein paar Gummibänder darüberziehen oder einen Gummizug in der Grösse des Objektivs am Plastiksack befestigen.

Nun ist der selbstgebastelte Regenschutz eigentlich schon fertig. Allenfalls kannst du auch noch eine Öffnung für deine rechte Hand hinzufügen. Auch hier müsstest du dann wieder die Öffnung mit Klebeband verstärken.

Weil der Regenschutz aus Plastik ist, reflektiert dieser recht viel Licht. Auch ist er bei Wind recht laut. Für die Tiere kann das störend sein. Ich habe deshalb vor Jahren meinen selber gebastelten Regenschutz gegen einen RainCoat ausgetauscht. Dieser ist zwar vergleichsweise etwas teurer, im Gegenzug ist er hochwertig und sehr durchdacht.

Der Regenschutz von Lenscoat

Die Firma Lenscoat bietet verschieden (Regen-)schütze für deine Kamera an. Alle funktionieren vom Grundprinzip gleich und sind aus dem gleichen, wasserdichten Stoff. In verschiedenen Grössen angeboten sind die Regenschütze perfekt an deine Kamera und dein Objektiv angepasst.  So gibt es den RainCoat in der Grösse Small, Medium und Large. Weiter können die Regenschütze in verschiedenen Farben und mit verschiedenen Tarnungen gekauft werden.

Der RainCoat von Lenscoat schützt die Kamera vor Regen, Schnee und Hagel.

An der Seite des RainCoats ist eine Öffnung, um die Kamera bedienen zu können. Diese Öffnung ist allerdings nur für die Standard und Pro Varianten erhältlich.

Die verschiedenen Modelle

RainCoat Small

Der Regenschutz in der Grösse Small ist ausschliesslich für Landschaftsfotografen zu empfehlen. Mit einer Länge von ungefähr 30 cm schützt der Regenschutz Kameras mit Objektiven bis zu ungefähr 70 mm.

RainCoat Medium

Mit der Grösse Medium lassen sich Objektive wie z.B. ein 70-200 mm oder ein 80-400 mm vor dem Regen schützen. Der Regenschutz hat eine Länge von ungefähr 43 cm.

RainCoat Large

Der Regenschutz in der Grösse Large hat eine Länge von 58 cm. Dieser Regenschutz passt z.B. für ein 300mm 2.8.

RainCoat Pro/ Standard

Zusätzlich bietet Lenscoat auch 4 weitere Regenschütze an. Diese sind nochmals grösser und sind damit auch genug lang für z.B. ein 600mm f/4.

Weiter haben diese 4 Regenschütze jeweils einen oder zwei Zugänge die Bedienung zu erleichtern. Der RainCoat Pro und der RainCoat Standard haben eine Öffnung auf der Rechten Seite an der Kamera. Damit kann man normal fotografieren und trotzdem wird die gesamte Kamera vor dem Regen geschützt. Ohne diesen Ärmel muss man nämlich den RainCoat zurückziehen, damit man die Kamera bedienen kann.

Der RainCoat 2 Standard und RainCoat 2 Pro haben zusätzlich einen Ärmel am Objektiv. Das ermöglicht, selbst mit dem RainCoat den Zoomring oder der Fokussierring am Objektiv zu drehen.

Doch was ist der Unterschied zwischen Standard und Pro? In der Pro-Ausführung ist dieser Regenschutz nochmals etwas grösser als der RainCoat large. Mit 77 cm reicht der Regenschutz für praktisch alle Teleobjektive. Falls dies tatsächlich noch nicht reichen sollte, wird noch eine Verlängerung mitgereicht.

Die Standard-Ausführung ist mit 52 cm etwas kürzer als der RainCoat Large. Es wird auch keine Erweiterung mitgeliefert.

Qualität

Die Regenschütze von Lenscoat haben alle eine sehr hohe Qualität. Ich besitze schon seit Jahren den gleichen RainCoat und dieser macht noch immer seinen Job wie am ersten Tag. Alles Nähte sind gut vernäht. Der Stoff ist wasserdicht und hat eine gute Qualität.

Durch verschiedene Klettverschlüsse und eine Zugkordel kann der RainCoat genau auf deine Ausrüstung angepasst werden. So kann mit einem Klettverschluss, der RainCoat an der Sonnenblende befestigt werden. Zwei weitere Klettverschlüsse helfen, den RainCoat kompakt am Objektiv zu halten. Mit der Zugkordel kann die Öffnung zu Kamera hin vergrössert oder verkleinert werden. So kann die Öffnung so klein gemacht werden, dass man nur noch den Sucher sieht.

Die Ärmel können jeweils zusammengefaltet und in einer angenähten Tasche mit einem Klettverschluss verstaut werden. Darin befindet sich zusätzlich eine weitere kleine Tasche, in welcher z.B. eine Batterie verstaut werden kann. Ich lasse den Ärmel aber jeweils immer offen, da ich ja mit meiner rechten Hand die Kamera bedienen will.

Zum RainCoat dazu kommt eine kleine Tasche hinzu, in welcher dieser verstaut werden kann.

Der Stoff ist wasserabweisend. Die Kamera ist dadurch gut geschützt.

Der Stoff des RainCoats ist wasserdicht und schützt deine Kamera auch im stundenlangen Regen.

Empfehlung

Eine Regenschutz ist ein Muss für jeden Naturfotografen. Ob man einen Regenschutz selber basteln will oder einen Regenschutz kaufen will, ist jedem selber überlassen. Auch ich selber habe zu Beginn nur einen Plastiksack als Regenschutz verwendet. Seit ich den RainCoat gekauft habe, könnte ich es mir nicht mehr vorstellen, einen Plastiksack zu verwenden.

Ich empfehle dir einen Regenschutz zu kaufen. Den Regenschutz von Lenscoat benutze auch ich schon seit mehreren Jahren. Er hat mich schon in den wildesten Herbststürmen begleitet oder meine Kamera bei Orkan am Sandstrand beschützt.

Im Vergleich zu einem selbstgebastelten Regenschutz funktioniert der RainCoat wesentlich zuverlässiger, ist einfacher anzubringen und ist auch weitaus langlebiger. Dadurch, dass der RainCoat aus Stoff ist, reflektiert er auch das Licht nicht. Bei Wind ist der RainCoat auch wesentlich leiser als ein Plastiksack. Weiter hat der RainCoat in einer Tarnmusterung natürlich einen Tarneffekt. Damit verringern sich auch die Chancen, dass ein Tier auf einen aufmerksam wird und davonzieht.

Du willst dir auch einen Regenschutz besorgen? In der folgenden Tabelle habe ich dir meine Empfehlungen für verschiedene Ausrüstungen zusammengefasst. Die Links sind Affiliate Links und führen dich auf die Seite von Lenscoat. Kaufst du über meinen Link einen Artikel, erhalte ich dafür eine kleine Provision. Für dich ändert sich der Preis aber nicht.

RainCoat Small

30 cm             24-70 f/2.8

Kaufen
RainCoat Medium

43 cm             70-200 f/2.8; 80-400 f/4.5-5.6

Kaufen
RainCoat Large

58 cm             300 f/2.8

Kaufen
RainCoat Standard

52 cm             300 f/2.8

Kaufen
RainCoat Pro

77 cm             600 f/4; 800 f/5.6

Kaufen
RainCoat 2 Standard

52 cm             300 f/2.8

Kaufen
RainCoat 2 Pro

77 cm             600 f/4; 800 f/5.6

Kaufen

Das könnte dich auch interessieren:

Review Nikon Z 70-200

  • Datum Veröffentlichung: 26.7.2022
  • Titel: Review: NIKKOR Z 70-200 mm 2.8 VR S
  • Text Snippet: The Nikon 70-200mm 2.8 is usually a bit too short for classic wildlife photography. But depending on the animal and the situation, the lens can make all the difference. I was recently allowed to test the lens for a few weeks. You can read about my experiences and findings in this article.
  • Foto: Review of the Nikon Z 70-200 2.8
  • erstes Foto: Review of the Nikon Z 70-200 2.8

For wildlife photography, telephoto lenses between 400mm to 600mm are the absolute standard in the vast majority of cases. Most animals are rather shy towards humans and have to be brought close with large and heavy lenses. But what if an animal does get close for once?

The Nikon Z 70-200mm 2.8 is the ideal lens for situations where animals get very close. The zoom gives you the flexibility to quickly switch between portraits and wide-angle images while the constant open aperture of 2.8 guarantees soft backgrounds.

I had the opportunity to test the lens for 2 weeks in various situations. Among other things, I went into the mountains for 4 days to look for ibex.

Das Nikon Z 70-200mm f/2.8 zusammen mit der Nikon Z9 im Test.

The Nikon Z9 + Z 70-200mm 2.8 combination is relatively compact for wildlife photography.

I was allowed to borrow the lens from Nikon Switzerland for the 2 weeks. I'm incredibly thankful for the opporunity but I would also like to say that this did not influence my review in any way.

Image quality

As with all Z lenses I have tested so far, the 70-200 leaves nothing to be desired in terms of image quality. Whether at 70mm or at 200mm, the lens remains extremely sharp throughout the zoom range and image defects such as chromatic aberrations are virtually undetectable.

To get the best possible image quality, I have so far mainly used fixed focal lengths. The 70-200 offers the quality of a fixed focal length but also the flexibility of a zoom. With rather large and more trusting animals, this means that without changing lenses, you can switch between close-ups, full-body portraits, and even wide-angle shots in the blink of an eye.

Beispielfotos mit dem Nikon Z 70-200mm f/2.8.

At 70mm, the lens is so wide-angle that a large portion of the surrounding area is also imaged. Such photos are a stark contrast to usual supertele photos, but can work just as well, if not better.

Beispielfotos mit dem Nikon Z 70-200mm f/2.8.

At 200mm, the image is already quite compressed in perspective. The background is soft but remains quite textured, which can be helpful in conveying a story.

Beispielfotos mit dem Nikon Z 70-200mm f/2.8.

If the subject is close enough, relatively classic photos can also be taken with the lens.

Autofocus

The autofocus is of course also very fast and precise. Unlike the 400mm 2.8 though, Nikon has not yet built in the new Silent Wave Motors (SWM) here. Is that a problem?

No, because the autofocus does its job as it is. In all the tests I did with the lens, the autofocus easily kept up. Only when I lost focus against the sky, the lens was sometimes a bit slow in getting the focus back. However, when there is enough contrast in the image, the combo of Z9 and 70-200 is extremely fast and focusing happens seemingly instantaneously.

Regarding focus, the low closest focusing distance should also be mentioned. With 0.5m at 70mm and 1m at 200mm, the lens is very well suited for close-ups. For these kind of images, normal superteles are less suitable. The new Z 400mm 2.8 does quite a good job with close-ups because of the built-in teleconverter but for example my 500mm f4 is not the ideal lens for close-ups.

Beispielfotos mit dem Nikon Z 70-200mm f/2.8.

Due to the close-up limit of only 0.5 to 1 m, beautiful close-ups can be created with this lens.

Image stabilizer

I found the VR particularly remarkable with this lens. Especially in combination with the IBIS of the Z9, the VR is extremely effective. This also made handheld videos possible, and in some cases even "slider-like" handheld shots. Unfortunately, I was only able to purchase a video gimbal a few weeks later. In combination with a DJI RS2, however, the 70-200 will most likely be extremely interesting for wildlife filmmakers.

What also falls into the "interesting for video" area: like the 400mm 2.8, the VR is virtually silent. So an annoying buzzing of the VR in the audio track is history. Of course, this also plays into the cards of a wildlife photographer. In combination with the Nikon Z9, you can be completely silent. On the other hand, with my 500mm f4 FL ED, there was still quite a loud buzz from the image stabilizer. This made sound recording via microphone from the camera hotshoe virtually impossible.

Weight and handling

The lens is very light by wildlife photography standards, weighing in at just under 1.4 kg. The lens is also rather compact in terms of size. In my f-stop Shinn, the lens easily fits next to the 500mm f/4 and various other lenses.

In terms of handling, the lens is the same as the other Z lenses. Behind the zoom ring, there are four buttons around the lens. You can assign various functions to these, such as AF-ON or Focus Recall. A little behind these four buttons is another one on the left side. This button can also be assigned various functions. I deactivated this button because I have my hand further in front of the lens and can't really reach it. But better one button too many than too few. I think in the long run I would have found a function for this button as well.

What is rather superfluous from my point of view is the display on the top. This can display the focus distance, focal length or aperture, among other things. Since everything I need to know is also shown in the viewfinder, I don't really have any use for the display.

Apart from this small detail, I like the lens very much. Together with the Z9, the lens makes an extremely robust impression. The center of gravity of the lens is very close to the camera, which made shooting quite comfortable for me.

Knöpfe und Fokus- und Zoomring des Nikon Z 70-200mm f/2.8.

The DISP button can be used to select what exactly should be shown on the display. For me personally, however, this display had no real use.

Knöpfe und Fokus- und Zoomring des Nikon Z 70-200mm f/2.8.

The lens has two Fn buttons which can be assigned with various functions. There are a total of 4 of the L-Fn2 around the lens barrel.

My conclusion

Overall, the 70-200mm f/ 2.8 for the Z mount performed extremely well in my tests. To be honest, anything else would have been a surprise and the image quality should be excellent for 3,000 francs. What rather surprised me were the results I could achieve with the lens. Especially in the mountains with the ibexes the 70-200mm was ideal and I had the lens a lot more often on the Z9 than I would have thought. The look you can create with focal lengths between 70 and 200mm is very different from the usual supertele images. The perspective is completely different and I find this variety exciting. So the lens in no way replaces my 500mm f/4, but would be quite an interesting addition to my equipment in the future.

This is actually my final conclusion. As a lens for wildlife photography, the Nikon Z 70-200mm 2.8 VR S would certainly not be my first choice or recommendation. As a companion to a super tele, however, the lens is a very valid option for wildlife. So if you already own a good telephoto and are looking for options to develop your imaging style in new directions, the 70-200mm is the perfect choice.

Buy the Nikon Z 70-200mm 2.8 VR S

You are interested in the Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8? With the purchase through affiliate links I receive a small commission. With this you support me and this website so that I can continue to write such reviews.

Official Site

Nikon Z 70-200mm 2.8 kaufen

Switzerland

Nikon Z 400mm 2.8 bei GraphicArt kaufen

Germany *

Nikon Z 400mm 2.8 bei FotoErhardt kaufen

International *

Nikon Z9 bei Adorama kaufen

Switzerland

Nikon Z 70-200mm 2.8 bei GraphicArt kaufen
Germany *
Nikon Z 70-200mm 2.8 bei Foto Erhardt kaufen

International *

Nikon Z 70-200 2.8 bei Adorama kaufen

The links marked with (*) are affiliate links. If you click on such an affiliate link and make a purchase through this link, I will receive a commission from the respective online store. The price does not change for you.

More images with the Z9 and the Z 70-200mm 2.8

  • Tierfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 70-200mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 70-200mm Tierfotos

  • Tierfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 70-200mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 70-200mm Tierfotos

  • Tierfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 70-200mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 70-200mm Tierfotos

Tierfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 70-200mm 2.8.

Nikon Z 70-200mm Tierfotos

  • Tierfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 70-200mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 70-200mm Tierfotos

  • Tierfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 70-200mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 70-200mm Tierfotos

  • Tierfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 70-200mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 70-200mm Tierfotos

Tierfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 70-200mm 2.8.

Nikon Z 70-200mm Tierfotos

You might also find interesting:

Review of the Nikon Z 800mm

  • Datum Veröffentlichung: 22.8.2022
  • Titel: Review: NIKKOR Z 800mm 6.3 VR S
  • Text Snippet: The Nikon 800mm 6.3 is very interesting for wildlife photographers at first glance. An extremely long focal length, with 2.4 kg relatively light and also price-wise the lens is very well positioned. My experiences with the lens and whether it also convinces in the field, I show you in this article.
  • Foto: Review of the NIKKOR Z 800mm 6.3 VR S
  • erstes Foto: Review of the NIKKOR Z 800mm 6.3 VR S

For wildlife photography, telephoto lenses with a focal length between 400mm and 600mm are the absolute standard in the vast majority of cases. Most animals are rather shy towards humans and need to be significantly magnified with large and heavy lenses. Sometimes, however, even 600mm is not enough for the animal to be imaged large enough.

The Nikon Z 800mm 6.3 is the ideal lens for situations where small animals in particular tend to stay at a distance. Thanks to the special Phase Fresnel lens, the lens is also relatively compact and, at 2.4kg, also very light.  Compared to the competition and also to Nikon's own f-mount equivalent, the new 800mm is also significantly cheaper.

I was allowed to test the lens for a week in various situations. Among other things, I went into the mountains for a few days to look for griffon vultures.

Das Nikon Z 800mm f/6.3 zusammen mit der Nikon Z9 im Test.
The Nikon Z9 + Z 800mm 6.3 combination is very interesting for wildlife photography.

I was allowed to borrow the lens for one week from Nikon Switzerland. I would like to thank them for this - but I would also like to say that this did not influence my review in any way.

Image quality

In terms of image quality, there are no bad surprises with this lens. Like all Nikon Z-mount lenses I have used so far, this lens leaves nothing to be desired optically. When I compare the sharpness of the new 400mm 2.8 with the 800mm 6.3, the 400 is slightly sharper, but both are on an incredibly good level. The 800mm is just "very, very sharp" and the 400mm is in a whole new league of its own. But I think I can tick off the subject of image quality. There's nothing to complain about, and flawless image quality has become pretty much standard for Z-mount lenses.
Beispielfotos mit dem Nikon Z 800mm f/6.3.
The Nikon 800mm f/6.3 is not only convincing in terms of compactness and weight, the lens also performs very well in terms of image quality.

Autofocus

While the autofocus is very fast, this is the biggest difference to the 400mm 2.8. Unlike the 400mm, the 800mm doesn't focus completely silently and is also a bit slower in speed. Presumably, the new Silky Swift VCM was not yet installed on the 800mm and instead a conventional autofocus system was used. This was surely also a question of cost but in general the difference is not really noticeable in most situations anyway.

Especially in quite good light, the focus is practically instantaneous even with the 800mm. In very low light though, the Z9 with the 800mm starts focus hunting. This in turn is rather slow, but that is probably due to the camera rather than the lens itself.

Beispielfotos mit dem Nikon Z 800mm f/6.3.
The autofocus of the 800mm f/6.3 is not quite as fast as that of the 400mm f/2.8, but it is quite sufficient in the vast majority of situations.

Especially when the autofocus is looking for contrast, you can also hear it. This is nowhere near as loud as the latest generation 500mm f/4, for example, but I still think it's important to mention that the lens isn't quite as quiet as the 400mm 2.8.

Regarding focus, the closest focusing distance is also worth mentioning. At 5 m, the lens is definitely not suitable for cooperative animals. If an animal comes closer than 5 m, the 800mm focal length would be a bit much anyway.

Overall, however, I can say in terms of autofocus: the lens and does its job really well, the 400mm 2.8 is just a bit faster and quieter.

Image stabilizer (VR)

I found the VR to be particularly remarkable with this lens. Especially in combination with the IBIS of the Z9, the VR is extremely effective. In tests with the lens, I got sharp photos with shutter speeds as slow as 1/13 of a second. Of course, with such a slow shutter speed, not all photos are perfectly sharp, so I added some safety margin in the field. Still, a high percentage of sharp photos at 800mm and around 1/30 second handheld shutter speed shows what this lens can do.

Unlike the autofocus, the lens' VR is completely silent, so it still lends itself very well to filming. Audio recordings from a microphone on the camera's hotshoe now no longer pick up any annoying buzzing from the VR.

Weight and handling

The Phase Fresnel lens allows for an extremely lightweight and compact design at least compared to other lenses with 800mm focal length. Nikon has already used this special type of lens for two other extremely popular lenses, namely the 300m f4 and the 500mm f5.6. Both lenses for the f-mount, the lenses are nevertheless exceptionally light, compact and yet razor sharp.

At just under 2.4kg, the 800mm is indeed a lightweight. Even with the relatively heavy Z9, I was able to shoot handheld for longer periods without a problem. What is especially noticeable compared to the 400mm, however, is that the lens is less well balanced for me personally, as much of the weight is far forward on the lens. This is especially noticeable because the manual focus ring is very far back. Since I personally still use manual focus quite a bit, this bothered me a bit. So I had to hold the lens quite weirdly in my hands to balance it well enough, but still get to the focus ring.

While we're on the subject of the focus ring, it has quite a bit of resistance and to get from infinity to very close, you turn for what feels like an eternity depending on your speed. The fact that the focus ring is so far back doesn't help with the whole matter either.

Further to the front of the lens is a function ring, as found on virtually all Z lenses. And like on all other Z lenses, this was pretty much the first thing I disabled in the menu. So far, I haven't really been able to get comfortable with this ring (and I've tried a few times).

I would prefer - as with the 400mm 2.8 - if the function ring and focus ring had swapped places. The Z9 offers the ability to swap zoom and focus on certain lenses. Maybe there will be that feature for the focus ring and the function ring someday.

The fact that the resistance and the position of the focus ring (something that is hardly needed with the Z9's focus system anyway) are the only real points of criticism shows how well the lens performs otherwise.

Knöpfe und Fokus- und Zoomring des Nikon Z 800mm f/6.3.
The focus ring is located behind the function ring. The two have a different texture so that they can be easily distinguished. Personally, I would have preferred to have the focus ring in the place of the function ring.
Knöpfe und Fokus- und Zoomring des Nikon Z 800mm f/6.3.
There is a switch on the lens to turn the autofocus on and off. Furthermore, the focus can also be limited to a minimum focus distance of 10m.

In addition to the function ring, there are four buttons around the lens barrel on the lens that can be assigned a function such as autofocus activation. A bit further back on the lens, on the left side, is another function button that can be assigned a wide range of functions. At the back, there are two small switches. Besides the choice between autofocus and manual focus, the focus can also be limited to a distance range. Like with the 400mm, I would've preferred to not only have the option between full and 10m infinity but also between 5-15 m.

Unlike the classic large fixed focal lengths, Nikon has incorporated a new lens hood mechanism on the 800mm. In terms of operation, it is more like the one found in smaller lenses. For me, the usual mechanism with the small screw would have fit a bit better. In the end, however, it works this way and it's only a small detail. Since the lens fit into the f-stop Shinn with the Z9 and the lens hood attached, I didn't have to deal much with the mechanism anyway.

Knöpfe und Fokus- und Zoomring des Nikon Z 70-200mm f/2.8.
The 800mm has a sunshade mechanism which is similar on much smaller lenses. For me, the classic approach would probably have suited better, but it doesn't really matter that much.

My conclusion

Overall, the lens makes a really good impression. Due to the long focal length, the low weight and the relatively low price, the lens is very interesting especially for bird photographers. Even on longer day trips in the mountains, the lens can be easily taken along and thanks to the long focal length, even very shy birds can be photographed relatively well. For me personally, however, it would not be or is not the first choice as a lens. 800mm are extremely advantageous for some situations, but in many cases also too much. Furthermore, I myself work very often with animals, for which the minimum focus distance of 5 m would not be sufficient. Here, for example, the 400mm 2.8 with a minimum focus distance of 2.5 m is much better suited. A big advantage of the 800mm over the 400mm is its price. For a little under 8,000 Swiss francs, the 800mm occupies a practically unoccupied region. Long fixed focal lengths used to cost well over 10,000 Swiss francs and cheaper telephoto lenses were then mostly zoom lenses and qualitatively far below the level of a fixed focal length. The 800mm breaks new ground here and combines very good quality with a relatively good price.

I would recommend this lens to photographers who work with very shy animals. Especially in combination with the new 400mm f/4.5, one would have covered the telephoto range extremely easily, flexibly and yet with high quality.

Where to buy the Nikon Z 800 mm 6.3 VR S

Are you interested in the Nikon Z 800 mm 6.3 VR S? With the purchase through affiliate links I receive a small commission. With that you support me and this website so I can keep writing reviews like this.

Official Site

Nikon Z 70-200mm 2.8 kaufen

Switzerland

Nikon Z 800mm 6.3 bei GraphicArt kaufen

Germany *

Nikon Z 400mm 2.8 bei FotoErhardt kaufen

International *

Nikon Z 800mm 6.3 bei Adorama kaufen

Switzerland

Nikon Z 800mm 6.3 bei GraphicArt kaufen

Germany *

Nikon Z 70-200mm 2.8 bei Foto Erhardt kaufen

International *

Nikon Z 800mm 6.3 bei Adorama kaufen
The links marked with (*) are affiliate links. If you click on such an affiliate link and make a purchase through this link, I will receive a commission from the respective online store. The price does not change for you.

More images with the Z9 and the Z 800mm 6.3 VR S

  • Wildlife image samples with the Nikon Z9 and the 800 6.3 PF.

    Nikon Z 800mm 6.3 PF Tierfotos

  • Wildlife image samples with the Nikon Z9 and the 800 6.3 PF.

    Sample images with the Nikon Z 800mm 6.3 PF

  • Wildlife image samples with the Nikon Z9 and the 800 6.3 PF.

    Sample images with the Nikon Z 800mm 6.3 PF

  • Wildlife image samples with the Nikon Z9 and the 800 6.3 PF.

    Sample images with the Nikon Z 800mm 6.3 PF

  • Wildlife image samples with the Nikon Z9 and the 800 6.3 PF.

    Sample images with the Nikon Z 800mm 6.3 PF

  • Wildlife image samples with the Nikon Z9 and the 800 6.3 PF.

    Sample images with the Nikon Z 800mm 6.3 PF

  • Wildlife image samples with the Nikon Z9 and the 800 6.3 PF.

    Sample images with the Nikon Z 800mm 6.3 PF

  • Wildlife image samples with the Nikon Z9 and the 800 6.3 PF.

    Sample images with the Nikon Z 800mm 6.3 PF

You might also find interesting:

Review: Nikon Z 400mm 2.8

  • Datum Veröffentlichung: 26.07.2022
  • Titel: Review: NIKKOR Z 400 mm 2.8 TC VR S
  • Text Snippet: The new Nikon 400mm 2.8 with integrated teleconverter for the Z-mount is a top class lens. I was allowed to test the lens for 2 days in different situations. You can find the results and my findings in this article.
  • Foto: Review of the NIKKOR Z 400 mm 2.8 TC VR S
  • erstes Foto: Review of the NIKKOR Z 400 mm 2.8 TC VR S

The recently announced Nikon Z 400mm 2.8 S TC is a top class lens. The fast tele shines with phenomenal image quality and an extremely fast autofocus. Thanks to a built-in 1.4x teleconverter, the fixed focal length is also very flexible, while the lens remains very lightweight. In fact, the lens only weighs a good 3 kg!

Overall, the lens seems ideal for wildlife photography, especially in combination with the Z9. I was allowed to test out the new lens for 2 days in various situations. You can read about my findings in this article.

Das Nikon Z 400mm f/2.8 zusammen mit der Nikon Z9 im Test.

The Nikon Z9 + Z 400mm 2.8 combination is probably one of, if not the best setup at the moment for wildlife photography.

The new features compared to the original version

Compared to the last f-mount version of the lens, a lot has changed. The lens has once again become a lot lighter, a teleconverter is now built directly into the lens and new autofocus motors have been installed.

The built-in teleconverter

The main thing is that there is now a teleconverter that is built into the lens. This can be conveniently switched on and off with a finger. So the lens transforms from a 400mm with f/2.8 to a 560mm with f/4 in no time. While the loss of quality by an external teleconverter was still quite strong, at least on my 500mm f/4, the image quality of the new lens with the TC switched on is still extremely good. While a small difference can be seen compared to the lens without the TC turned on, it is relatively small in the first place and at 400mm the lens is also really incredibly sharp.

The ability to switch back and forth between 400mm and 560mm is something I really appreciated. When 400mm is a bit too short, I was able to gain magnification in a flash without losing much image quality or the closest focusing distance. This also allowed me to take very close portrait shots. At 560mm and a closest focusing distance of 2.5m, the lens is ideal for close-ups!

Ein Haubentaucher, fotografiert mit der Nikon Z9 und dem Nikon 400mm f/2.8.

Due to the closest focusing distance of only 2.5 m and thanks to the integrated teleconverter, beautiful close-ups can be created with this lens.

New autofocus motors

With the 400mm 2.8, Nikon has also launched a new type of autofocus motors called "Silky Swift VCM". I personally don't know where exactly the difference is to conventional AF motors. What I do know is that the new motors work, and pretty good!

My 500mm f/4 of the previous generation did already pretty great in terms of autofocus. But the new 400 takes it up a notch in terms of speed and quietness. Combined with the Nikon Z9, the AF is not only incredibly fast, but also virtually silent. Outdoors, I never really noticed the focus motor. For the species I mainly shoot, the noise of the autofocus (and the VR's - but more on that later) has never really been a problem, but being able to be completely silent makes the whole thing that much more pleasant. And with some very shy species, this will certainly offer another big advantage.

Ein Alpensegler, fotografiert mit der Nikon Z9 und dem Nikon 400mm f/2.8.

Together with the Z9, the incredibly fast and agile alpine swifts can also be photographed.

Image stabilizer

The image stabilizer (VR) in the lens is extremely powerful in combination with the Z9's image stabilizer, and I easily managed to shoot handheld at 1/20 second and below. The aspect of the VR that I like much more, however, is its noise level. The 500's VR's is still quite loud and can be heard quite well even when outdoors. The new 400mm's VR, however, is practically silent and only really audible in a small quiet room. So together with the Z9 and the extremely quiet AF motors, you can really photograph and film practically noiseless...

While the VR already worked quite well on my 500 for filming, it was always a bit too loud and was clearly picked up by the microphone. With the 400mm, this is no longer a problem.

Weight and handling

At just under 3 kg, the new tele is relatively light. The counterpart for the f-mount is a good 750 g heavier. In addition, it must be taken into account that there is now a teleconverter integrated. My 500mm is almost the same weight, but because the weight is further forward than the new 400mm, the 500mm seems to be a bit heavier. Due to the low weight, the 400mm is also very good for handheld photography. As usual with Nikon, there are 4 Fn buttons on the front of the lens. There is also an L-Fn button on the left side of the lens, slightly behind the tripod base. Next to the focus ring is an additional function ring for aperture, ISO or exposure compensation and a ring for resetting to specific focus positions.

The 4 buttons on the lens are a bit larger than on the 500mm f/4. I don't use the buttons very often, but they are very handy when filming animals and the bigger size makes them easier to use.

The L-Fn button on the side, on the other hand, I find a bit strangely placed. You can't really reach the button when photographing handheld and generally I don't know anything that would fit here. However, this could probably be due to the fact that I only had a little time with the lens.

I disabled the ring that you can set for aperture, ISO, or exposure compensation because I got to the ring too easily when shooting handheld and then changed settings unintentionally.

The front-most ring, on the other hand, I find very useful again. When I first read about it, I was a bit unsure about how exactly this ring was supposed to work and what the benefit might be. In the two days of testing, however, it turned out that the ring is quite helpful. You can rotate it a few degrees to the left and to the right and thus retrieve a certain, previously saved focus distance. The ring then turns back to the center with the help of a spring. If, for example, you are photographing at a location where birds often land in two different places, you can save these distances for the two directions of rotation. Meaning: If you turn the ring to the left, the lens will focus on one spot, if you turn the ring to the right, the lens will focus on the other spot. If two focus positions are not enough, you can also assign additional positions to buttons on the Z9.

So far, I've really only been able to rave about the lens. The only thing I'm not completely satisfied with is the position and feel of the focus ring. It's behind the ring for aperture/ISO/exposure compensation. However, I would rather have the two just the other way around so that I could keep my hand on the lens a little further forward. For birds in flight, in fact, I have developed a technique where I need manual focus, and there I noticed in the 2 days with the lens that the position of the focus ring does not suit me that well. With the 500, the focus ring is much better, although it should be noted that this lens has no other rotating rings. In addition, the focus ring on the 400 is not as easy to turn as it was on the 500. Of course, the focus ring shouldn't be able to rotate too quickly either, and perhaps it was also because the test lens was fairly new. However, I would have preferred a slightly easier rotation.

There are also two switches on the lens that allow you to turn the autofocus on and off, as well as limit it to a certain distance. So either 2.5m-Full or 7m-Full. I would also find a position of 2.5m-7m, as found in the Sony 400mm for example, interesting. From my point of view, this would make photographing birds in flight even easier.

Die Bedienungsringe des Nikon Z 400mm f/2.8.

The focus position ring, function ring, and focus ring (not pictured here) all have different textures. The four buttons are all around the front of the lens and slightly larger compared to my 500mm f/4.

Die Knöpfe des Nikon Z 400mm f/2.8.

On the side, the sliders have been reduced somewhat. The VR can now be adjusted directly in the camera. However, I find the L-Fn a bit awkwardly positioned.

Der Fokusring des Nikon Z 400mm f/2.8.

The focus ring is a bit too far back for me personally. Although I rarely need it, it would suit me better if the focus ring had swapped places with the function ring, especially for birds in flight.

General impression

The new Nikon 400mm 2.8 convinces with an enormously good image quality, an incredibly fast autofocus and its silent AF motors and VR. Add to that the low weight of a little under 3 kg and the quite compact size. Even without the integrated teleconverter, this lens would have been an impressive one. But thanks to the built-in teleconverter, this lens gives you both an extremely powerful 400mm at f/2.8 and a 560mm at f/4.

But this also has its price. 16'499 swiss francs, to be exact. This also makes it 3'000 - 4'000 francs more expensive than similar lenses from Sony and Canon. It should be noted that the Nikon is the only 400mm 2.8 with an integrated teleconverter. In relation to the competition, I find the higher price somewhat justified. In absolute terms, however, 16'499 Swiss francs is a lot for a lens. For professionals who work with it every day and need the absolute best quality, the investment is definitely worth it.

Das Nikon Z 400mm f/2.8 im Vergleich zum Nikon AF-S 500mm f/4 FL ED.

Especially in comparison to the 500mm f/4 FL ED with attached FTZ adapter, the 400mm 2.8 is again a bit more compact.

If you are thinking about definitely saying goodbye to the f-mount and switching to the Z-mount, you won't regret your decision for a minute with this lens. The lens leaves virtually nothing to be desired and, especially when paired with the Z9, is an incredibly powerful tool for taking wildlife photography to a new level.

I myself had to return the lens after 2 days with a heavy heart, even though my 500mm f/4 still does a super job. A big thanks goes out to GraphicArt and Nikon Switzerland  for this incredible opportunity.

Buy the Nikon Z 400mm 2.8 TC VR

Offizielle Seite

Buy the Nikon Z 400mm 2.8

Switzerland

Buy the Nikon Z 400mm 2.8 at GraphicArt

Germany *

Buy the Nikon Z 400mm 2.8 at FotoErhardt

International *

Buy the Nikon Z 400mm 2.8 at Adorama

Switzerland

Buy the Nikon Z 400mm 2.8 at GraphicArt

Germany *

Buy the Nikon Z 400mm 2.8 at FotoErhardt

International *

Buy the Nikon Z 400mm 2.8 at Adorama

The links marked with (*) are affiliate links. If you click on such an affiliate link and make a purchase through this link, I will receive a commission from the respective online store. The price does not change for you.

More images with the Z9 and the Z 400mm 2.8

  • Tierfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 400mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 9 Tierfotos

  • Vogelfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 400mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 9 Tierfotos

  • Vogelfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 400mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 9 Tierfotos

  • Tierfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 400mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 9 Tierfotos

  • Vogelfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 400mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 9 Tierfotos

  • Tierfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 400mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 9 Tierfotos

  • Vogelfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 400mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 9 Tierfotos

  • Tierfotos Beispiele mit der Nikon Z9 und dem 400mm 2.8.

    Nikon Z 9 Tierfotos

You might also find interesting:

Should you buy a teleconverter in 2022

  • Datum Veröffentlichung: 25.3.2021
  • Titel: Should you buy a teleconverter in 2022?
  • Text Snippet: A few months ago I was lucky enough to test a teleconverter. In this article I write about my experiences with it and whether I would recommend a converter.
  • Foto:
  • erstes Foto:

Should you buy a teleconverter in 2021?

In wildlife photography, you never seem to get close enough to an animal and the focal length could still be a little longer. But the higher the focal length of the lens, the higher its price usually is. Teleconverters, however, promise to be able to multiply the focal length with relatively little financial effort.

A 300mm can be turned into a 420mm with a 1.4x teleconverter, and even a 600mm with a 2x teleconverter. Those usually 'only' cost a couple hundred francs, which is not a lot if you compare it to lenses with such focal lengths. But teleconverters also have disadvantages: you lose some sharpness and light with the teleconverter. The big question is whether the disadvantages outweigh the advantages or whether a teleconverter is worthwhile.

How does a teleconverter work?

A teleconverter is attached between the lens and the camera. The teleconverter contains additional lens groups that throw the light rays further out. As a result, only light rays from a narrower image area end up on the sensor. The image is enlarged and the magnification is that of a lens with a longer focal length. But the focal length is not actually changed. So the image compression remains the same as it would have been without the converter. So a teleconverter works in exactly the same way as cropping an image would.

Why a teleconverter

With a teleconverter, focal lengths can be enlarged very efficiently. For photographers who do not crop their images, this is the only way to change the frame with fixed focal lengths.

For photographers who crop their images, however, a teleconverter can also be interesting. Because of the higher magnification, you can work with more pixels. So if a bird is very far away, you have more pixels of the bird with the teleconverter than if you simply crop the picture on the PC.

This is especially advantageous if you want to take part in photography competitions. These often have minimum requirements regarding the resolution of the pictures. You will see later why this makes no sense. In principle, however, the teleconverter allows you to enlarge the image more.

In theory, this can be helpful not only in photo competitions. You should actually get a better resolution for printing. In practice, however, the advantages are only marginal, if they exist at all. This is because the teleconverter also has very big disadvantages.

Der Nikon TC-14E III im Test

Disadvantages of a teleconverter

Since the teleconverter only enlarges the final image, the image quality is highly dependent on the optical performance of the lens. If a lens renders an edge incorrectly, e.g. out of focus or with chromatic aberration, this can be amplified by the teleconverter.

The performance of the teleconverter also depends on the sensor of the camera. On a camera with a high resolution, image errors are much easier to detect than on a camera with a low resolution. So depending on the lens and camera, the performance of the teleconverter can vary greatly. In this article I refer exclusively to my experience with the TC1.4E III teleconverter from Nikon on my Nikon D850 and the 500mm f/4 FL ED.

The poorer image quality is not the only disadvantage of a teleconverter. You also loose light with a teleconverter. A certain amount of light no longer falls on the sensor and the amount of light for each pixel is correspondingly smaller.

With a teleconverter with a 1.4x magnification, you lose exactly one f-stop of light. The largest f-stop at 500mm f/4 is no longer f/4 but 5.6. With a 2x teleconverter you would even lose 2 f-stops. Instead of f/4, f/8 would then be the widest aperture.

To compensate for the loss of light, you either have to choose a slower the shutter speed or increase the ISO sensitivity. Especially with the increase of the ISO value, the image quality can again suffer significantly.

Another disadvantage of a teleconverter is the slower autofocus speed. Even though my lens is actually extremely fast, it had a lot more trouble with the teleconverter and was generally slower.

As you can see, the gain in focal length with the teleconverter is a big compromise. Not only do you lose image sharpness in general, you also lose image quality due to the lower widest aperture and therefore a higher ISO value. Finally, there is the slower autofocus, which in certain cases can also contribute to blurred photos. Despite these major disadvantages, it is not clear whether a teleconverter really makes sense. If you compare photos with and without a teleconverter, the photos are practically identical.

Converter vs cropping

During my first attempts with the teleconverter, I quickly noticed that the image quality suffers quite a bit under the TC. Details were no longer as sharp, contrasts were somewhat lower and, due to the loss of an aperture stop, the noise of the camera was of course somewhat stronger. So I was able to crop a lot less than I would have been able to without the teleconverter. But this was not absolutely necessary, because I already had a narrower image section due to the TC.

But since I never had the time to take off the converter when photographing birds in order to compare the image qualities, I show two test images here for comparison. The only difference is the teleconverter. I then cropped the picture without the teleconverter so that it had the same image detail as the photo with the converter.

Even after looking at it for a while, I couldn't see any big differences between the two photos. Although the image with the teleconverter has a much higher resolution, the images are almost identically sharp. At a very high magnification (about 300%), the combination with the TC is slightly ahead. But the differences remain minimal.

This should also make it clear that minimum resolutions do not necessarily make sense in a photo competition. The picture with the converter has 2000 pixels more on the longer side, but it is practically as sharp as the one without the teleconverter.

What could not be demonstrated in this test is the autofocus. This is much slower and somewhat less accurate with the TC. In these ideal conditions, the autofocus never had any problems focusing, even with the TC. When photographing birds or other moving subjects, the slower autofocus is quite noticeable and can lead to blurred photos. In the end, the photos taken in the field with the teleconverter are more negatively affected than in a static test.

500mm without 1.4x TC but cropped

500mm with 1.4x TC

Ein Testfoto mit dem Nikon 500mm f4E.

Ein Testfoto mit dem Nikon 500mm f4E und dem TC14E III.

500mm without 1.4x TC but cropped

500mm with 1.4x TC and cropped

Ein Testfoto mit dem Nikon 500mm f4E.

Ein Testfoto mit dem Nikon 500mm f4E und dem TC14E III.

Is a teleconverter worth its money?

Now that I have shown that the image quality hardly differs from the image without the teleconverter, but that the autofocus is much slower, the question arises whether a teleconverter is worthwhile at all.

For me personally, this is a pretty clear no. However, this is not necessarily due to the teleconverter, but may also be due to my equipment. I can well imagine that the same teleconverter would have worked much better with, for example, a Nikon Z6 or a D6. With 24MP or 20MP you can crop much less and the teleconverter gains in usefulness again.

Personally, the sacrifices in speed and reliability of autofocus are too great for me to justify the minimal advantage in image quality. I would rather have a picture of a bird where the eye is in focus than a picture where the tail feathers are in focus but the image quality is marginally better because the autofocus was too slow.

I would therefore only recommend a teleconverter to people who have a camera with a rather low resolution and a very good lens. A rather cheap lens may seem very good without a teleconverter, but with the converter the flaws become apparent. The same applies to cameras with high resolutions. Nevertheless, I recommend everyone to try out a teleconverter. It may well be that the converter achieves very good results with your equipment. I was also able to try out the teleconverter. I would like to thank Thomas Schüpbach from Digital Studio Schüpbach for this.

Images with the teleconverter

  • Eine Wasseramsel sucht im Wasser nach Larven.

    Fotos Mit Dem Telekonverter 3

    1/800 | f/ 5.6 | ISO 2500 | 700mm

  • Eine Wasseramsel sucht im Wasser nach Larven. Das Foto wurde mit einer langen Belichtungszeit fotografiert.

    Fotos Mit Dem Telekonverter 2

    1/10 | f/ 10 | ISO 90 | 700mm

  • Eine Wasseramsel sucht im Wasser nach Larven.

    Fotos Mit Dem Telekonverter 4

    1/800 | f/ 5.6 | ISO 1600 | 700mm

  • Eine Wasseramsel sucht im Wasser nach Larven.

    Fotos Mit Dem Telekonverter 1

    1/500 | f/ 5.6 | ISO 1600 | 700mm

  • Germany

    Buy

  • Germany

    Buy

  • International

    Buy

  • International

    Buy

The links are affiliate links. If you click on such an affiliate link and make a purchase via this link, I will receive a commission from the respective online shop. For you the price does not change.

You might also find interesting:

Testbericht: Nikon 500mm f/4

  • Datum Veröffentlichung: 4.7.2020
  • Titel: Testbericht: Nikon 500mm f/4
  • Text Snippet: Kürzlich erfüllte ich mir einen lang gehegten Traum vom Kauf eines besseren Teleobjektivs. Mittlerweile habe ich das Objektiv schon seit über 3 Monaten und es wird Zeit, das Objektiv einmal zu ‘reviewen’.
  • Foto:
  • erstes Foto:

Testbericht: Das Nikon 500mm f/4 FL ED VR im Test

Kürzlich erfüllte ich mir einen lang gehegten Traum vom Kauf eines besseren Teleobjektivs. Mittlerweile habe ich das Objektiv schon seit über 3 Monaten und es wird Zeit, das Objektiv einmal zu ‘reviewen’.

Das Nikon 500mm f/ 4 FL ED ist ein Objektiv der Spitzenklasse. Mit einer maximalen Blendenöffnung von f/ 4 ist es enorm lichtstark und trotzdem enorm scharf. Neben zahlreichen optischen Verbesserungen ist es es dank neuen Fluorit-Linsen auch deutlich leichter als sein Vorgänger-Modell. Doch ist es denn wirklich sein Geld wert?

Wie und wo ich das Objektiv gekauft habe

Ursprünglich hatte ich eigentlich vor, ein gebrauchtes Nikon 500mm f/4 G zu kaufen. Dabei handelt es sich um die zweitneuste Version. Als das Objektiv schließlich mit der Post eintraf, machte der Autofokus einige sehr seltsame Geräusche. Weil die Linse wahrscheinlich länger nicht benutzt wurde waren die Kontaktstellen des Silent-Wave-Motors wahrscheinlich leicht korrodiert. Allerdings könnte das Objektiv aber auch während des Transports beschädigt worden sein. So oder so, das Geräusch wäre vielleicht mit der Zeit verschwunden. Dabei hätte ich aber auch die endgültige Beschädigung des AF’s riskiert. Die Reparatur hätte viel Geld gekostet, da die Garantie bereits ausgelaufen war.

Als ich mich mit dem Händler in Verbindung setzte, teilte er mir mit, dass er auch die neuere Version, die E-Version des Objektivs, gerade zum Verkauf anbot. Die neuere Version war sogar noch etwas teurer. Da ich aber für eine Reparatur des älteren Objektivs vielleicht den gleichen Betrag hätte zahlen müssen, entschied ich mich schließlich für den Kauf der neueren Version.

Die Linse wies diesmal keinerlei Mängel auf. Das Objektiv wurde zusammen mit einem soliden Koffer, einem Trageriemen und einem ‘Lenscoat’ geliefert. Dieser war jedoch nicht von Lenscoat, sondern von Rolanpro. Dieser hat zwar einige grosse Vorteile gegenüber dem Lenscoat, aber auch einige bedeutende Nachteile.

Das Nikon 500mm f/ 4 FL ED im Test

AF-Feinabstimmung

Wie bei allen neuen Objektiven musste als erstes eine Feinabstimmung des AF vorgenommen werden. Während die D850 dies eigentlich automatisch machen könnte, habe ich dieses Objektiv manuell eingestellt. Schlussendlich erhielt ich einen Wert von +4. Um mir bei der Suche nach den richtigen Justierung zu helfen, verwendete ich ein LensAlign. Während das Objektiv jetzt recht gut kalibriert zu sein scheint, habe ich die Kalibrierungsoptionen meines alten Sigma-Objektivs bevorzugt. Dieses erlaubte mir, Korrekturen für verschiedene Entfernungen vorzunehmen. Mit dem Nikon kann man nur eine globale Einstellung für das Objektiv vornehmen.

Erste Versuche

Nachdem ich das Objektiv kalibriert hatte, musste ich es sofort ausprobieren. Auch wenn die Tiere an diesem Abend leider nur spärlich vorhanden waren, gelang es mir, immerhin ein gutes Bild einer Rohrweihe zu bekommen. Besonders der AF fühlte sich im Vergleich zu meinem alten Objektiv sofort besser an. Auch die Schärfe war viel besser. Aber dazu später mehr.

Mit dem schnellen Autofokus des Nikon 500mm f/ 4 FL ED konnte ich diese Rohrweihe perfekt ablichten.

Qualität vs. mein altes Objektiv

Bevor ich die 500 mm f/4 kaufte, verwendete ich eine Sigma 150-600 f/5-6.3 Sports. Auch wenn es ein bisschen albern ist, zwei Objektive mit einem völlig anderen Preispunkt zu vergleichen, denke ich, dass es für einige Fotografen, die ebenfalls eine Upgrade ihres Objektivs in Betracht ziehen, recht interessant sein könnte. Auch mein altes Objektiv habe ich aus zweiter Hand gekauft. Ich benutze das Objektiv seit über 4,5 Jahren, und in dieser Zeit hat es einiges durchgemacht  . Ich habe es bei schweren Stürmen an Stränden und in anderen schmutzigen und rauen Umgebungen eingesetzt. Während dieser Zeit hatte ich nie Probleme mit dem Objektiv, und abgesehen von ein paar Kratzern am Gehäuse funktioniert es noch wie am ersten Tag. Aber warum habe ich dann überhaupt auf ein neues Objektiv gewechselt?

AF-Geschwindigkeit

Die größte Schwäche des Sigma war der Autofokus. Selbst gepaart mit dem sehr schnellen Autofokus der D850 ist der AF sehr langsam. Scharfe Bilder von fliegenden Vögeln sind fast unmöglich. Hinzu kommt, dass der AF auch ziemlich ungenau ist, vor allem bei schlechten Lichtverhältnissen. Dies auch wegen der nicht so schnellen Blende. Mit der größten Blende von 600 mm bei f/6,3 lässt sie nicht viel Licht für den Autofokus herein.

Aufgrund der Blende sind die AF-Punkte des D850 sehr begrenzt und nur der Fokuspunkt in der Mitte ist mehr oder weniger zuverlässig.

Mit dem 500mm f/4 ist der AF stattdessen extrem schnell. Die Scharfstellung erfolgt sehr schnell, und ‘Focus hunting’ passiert nur sehr selten und meist nur bei sehr kleinen Motiven. Dank der grossen Blendenöffnung sind mehr AF-Sensoren kreuzförmig, was es mir erlaubt, Fokuspunkte zu verwenden, die sich auf der rechten oder linken Bildseite befinden. Dies ist äußerst hilfreich bei Vögeln, die den Rahmen ausfüllen. Dann kann ich den Fokuspunkt unter Beibehaltung der Komposition auf das Auge verlagern.

Was ich jedoch festgestellt habe, ist, dass die Scharfeinstellung sehr viel langsamer wird, wenn man auf sehr nahe Objekte fokussiert. Eine weitere Kritikpunkt und wahrscheinlich der einzige Nachteil des 500mm ist die minimale Fokusdistanz. Das Nikon hat eine Naheinstellgrenze von 3,6 m, während die Sigma bis auf 2,6 m scharfstellen kann. Während minimale Scharfstellentfernungen für einen Tierfotografen meist kein Problem darstellen, hatte ich schon mehrfach Gelegenheit, bei denen dieser zusätzliche Meter einen großen Unterschied gemacht hätte.

Das Nikon 500mm f/ 4 FL ED hat einen sehr schnellen Autofokus und kann selbst schnelle Greifvögel scharfstellen.

Schärfe

Wie zu erwarten war, ist die 500 mm ein ganzes Stück schärfer als das Sigma. Dies war zu erwarten, da Festbrennweiten im Allgemeinen schärfer sind als Zoomobjektive. Wegen der schnelleren Blende habe ich sogar zwei Blendenstufen mehr, die ich bei der ISO-Empfindlichkeit einsparen kann. Dadurch kann ich eine noch bessere Bildqualität erzielen.

Bokeh

Obwohl die Brennweite des Nikon 100 mm kürzer ist als die des Sigma, ist das Bokeh viel glatter und sauberer als das Bokeh des Sigma. Daher ist auch die Hintergrundtrennung besser. Als Referenz benutzte ich den DOF-Rechner von dofmaster.com. Zwar ist der Unterschied in der Theorie nur gering. Zum Beispiel bei 20 m macht der Unterschied von 0,04 m geringerer Schärfentiefe einen kleinen Unterschied aus. In der Praxis ist der Unterschied aber recht deutlich. Die etwas bessere Hintergrundtrennung bei geringerer Brennweite erlaubt es mir kreativere Kompositionen auszuprobieren.

Nikon 500mm f/4 FL ED

Hyperfokale Entfernung

2083,83 m

Hyperfokal nahe der Grenze

1041,92 m

DoF nahe der Grenze

19,81 m

DoF-Ferngrenze

20,19 m

Tiefenschärfe

0,37 m

Tiefenschärfe vorne

0,19 m (49,53%)

Tiefenschärfe hinten

0,19 m (50,47%)

Sigma 150-600 f/ 5-6.3 Sports

Hyperfokale Entfernung

1890,48 m

Hyperfokal nahe der Grenze

945,24 m

DoF nahe der Grenze

19,8 m

DoF-Ferngrenze

20,21 m

Tiefenschärfe

0,41 m

Tiefenschärfe vorne

0,2 m (49,49%)

Tiefenschärfe hinten

0,21 m (50,51%)

VR

Bevor ich das Objektiv kaufte, las ich in mehreren Rezensionen, dass ein Stativ oder Einbeinstative notwendig sind, um scharfe Bilder zu erhalten. Auch wenn dies theoretisch richtig sein mag, so bin ich doch zum größten Teil anderer Meinung. Ein Stativ bringt zwar viel Stabilität, aber es schränkt einen auch sehr ein. Beispielsweise ist es mit einem Stativ sehr zeitaufwendig, durch Blätter zu spähen, um einen schönen Rahmen um einen Vogel zu erhalten. Bis du das Stativ richtig eingestellt hast, ist der Vogel schon weg. Du kannst auch nicht einfach deine Positionierung anpassen, um einen besseren Hintergrund zu erhalten.

Wenn du aber ein ganzes Set-up mit einer Sitzwarte hast und du dich in einem Versteck befindest, ist ein Stativ viel nützlicher. Wenn ich zum Beispiel stundenlang darauf warte, dass ein Bartgeier den Bergrücken entlangfliegt, habe ich meine Kamera ebenfalls auf einem Stativ aufgestellt. Wenn ich draußen im Wald oder im Schilf auf der Suche nach Singvögeln bin, lasse ich mein Stativ zu Hause. Während vor allem im Wald, das Licht ist sehr begrenzt Handheld-Bilder sind immer noch möglich. Die VR in diesem Objektiv ermöglichte es mir, scharfe Bilder von etwa 1/80stel zu erhalten. Besonders bei Singvögeln ist dies nur theoretisch möglich, da die meisten von ihnen zu aktiv sind, um scharfe Bilder mit einem 1/80stel zu erhalten. Dank der neueren Kameras kann man ja den ISO-Wert immer noch leicht etwas anheben.

Was ich auch herausgefunden habe, ist, dass das Umschalten des VR-Modus von Normal auf Sport sehr hilfreich sein kann, insbesondere beim Fotografieren von sich bewegenden Vögeln wie Enten oder Raubvögeln. Die Linse erlaubt dann eine Bewegung in eine einzige Richtung.

500 mm gegenüber 600 mm

Während die Brennweite in der Tierfotografie meistens nie lang genug sein kann, sind 500 mm für mich mehr als genug. Es erlaubt mir, mehr von der Umwelt einzubeziehen. Die D850 erlaubt es mir auch, bei Bedarf ein wenig zu croppen. Außerdem ist das 500mm etwas leichter als die beiden Versionen des 600mm f/4. Wenn es wirklich nötig wäre, sollte das 500mm f/4 auch mit Telekonvertern ziemlich gut funktionieren. Ich selbst besitze keine TC’s und muss ich zuerst einmal noch ausprobieren.

Das Nikon 500mm f/ 4 FL ED im Vergleich zum Sigma 150-600mm.

Schlussfolgerung

Obwohl das 500mm F/4 ein sehr teures und schweres Objektiv ist, bin ich mit meiner Wahl mehr als zufrieden. Dadurch konnte ich Bilder machen, die ich mit meinem alten Objektiv nie bekommen hätte. Was die Qualität betrifft, so gibt es nichts zu beanstanden. Das Einzige, was verbessert werden könnte, ist die Naheinstellgrenze, die AF-Geschwindigkeit im Nahbereich und die Fokus-Feinabstimmung. Während die AF-Abstimmung gut funktionierte, war die Kalibrierung des Sigma-Objektivs viel tiefgreifender. Für mich persönlich hätte ich mir auch gewünscht, dass der Linsenfuss für ein Gimbal Kopf Arca Swiss kompatibel wäre (wie beim neuen Sigma 60-600 Sport). Deshalb habe ich die Stativschelle durch den Wimberley AP-551 ersetzt.

Wo kann man das Objektiv kaufen?

Der folgende Link ist ein Affiliate Link. Kaufst du über meinen Link das Objektiv, erhalte ich dafür eine kleine Provision. Für dich ändert sich der Preis aber nicht.

Foto-Erhardt:

Kaufen

Weitere Fotos

  • Zwei Biber bei der gegenseitigen Fellpflege.

    Nikon 500mm f/4 Review Biber

  • Ein Biber frisst frisches Gras am Ufer.

    Nikon 500mm f/4 Review Biber

  • Ein Bluthänfling in den Rebbergen.

    Nikon 500mm f/4 Review Bluthänfling

  • Ein Braunkehlchen im Raps.

    Nikon 500mm f/4 Review Braunkehlchen

  • Ein junger Gänsesäger mit einem gerade gefangenen Fisch.

    Nikon 500mm f/4 Review Gänsesäger

  • Eine Goldammer im Gegenlicht auf seiner Sitzwarte.

    Nikon 500mm f/4 Review Goldammer

  • Ein Grünfink am frühen Abend auf Nahrungssuche.

    Nikon 500mm f/4 Review Grünfink

  • Ein Grünspecht im Wald klettert einem Baum hinauf.

    Nikon 500mm f/4 Review Grünspecht

  • Eine Kolbenente schwimmt dem Flussufer entlang.

    Nikon 500mm f/4 Review Kolbenente

  • Ein Neuntöter am frühen Abend.

    Nikon 500mm f/4 Review Neuntöter

  • Ein Schwarzkehlchen in einem Rapsfeld auf Nahrungssuche-

    Nikon 500mm f/4 Review Schwarzkehlchen

  • Ein Mornellregenpfeifer auf Rast in den Alpen.

    Nikon 500mm f/4 Review Mornellregenpfeifer

Das könnte dich auch interessieren:

Wacom Intuos Grafik Tablet

  • Datum Veröffentlichung: 24.2.2021
  • Titel: Wacom Intuos Grafik Tablet Review
  • Text Snippet: Mit dem Ziel, meinen Workflow zu verbessern, habe ich mir vor zwei Jahren ein Grafik Tablet der Marke Wacom gekauft. Ob ich mit dem Tablet zufrieden bin und wie stark ich meinen Workflow verbessern konnte, erfährst du in diesem Artikel.
  • Foto:
  • erstes Foto:

Wacom Intuos Grafik Tablet Review

Mit dem Ziel, meinen Workflow zu verbessern, habe ich mir vor ein paar Jahren ein Grafik Tablet der Marke Wacom gekauft. Ob ich mit dem Tablet zufrieden bin und wie stark ich meinen Workflow verbessern konnte, erfährst du in diesem Artikel.

Wozu ein Grafiktablet?

Mein Workflow, um Bilder zu bearbeiten, besteht grundsätzlich aus zwei Blöcken. Zuerst bearbeite ich das Bild global in Lightroom. Ich passe also z.B. das Bild gesamthaft in seiner Helligkeit oder dem Kontrast an. Für lokale Anpassungen, also z.B. einer gewissen Gefiederpartie des Vogels oder dem Hintergrund, wechsle ich zu Photoshop. Um z.B. eine Änderung nur auf den Hintergrund anzuwenden muss ich den Vogel mühselig maskieren. Dies ist zwar auch mit einer normalen Maus möglich, bei feineren Federdetails wird das ganze extrem aufwendig.

Ein Grafik Tablet ist hier deutlich effizienter und genauer. Dank der drucksensitiven Oberfläche erfolgt auch das Anwenden von schwachen Bildanpassungen viel genauer. In der Praxis bedeutet das z.B., dass eine Stelle des Bildes dunkler wird je fester ich drücke. Somit kann ich sehr leicht helle Bereiche im Hintergrund etwas abdunkeln oder zu dunkle Bereiche etwas aufhellen. Ein Mausklick hingegen bedeutet hingegen immer das gleiche. Egal wie fest oder wie sanft ich klicke, die Stelle wird immer gleich stark abgedunkelt.

Meine Meinung zum Wacom Intuos Pro M

Nachdem ich im Internet verschiedene Berichte gelesen habe, entschied ich mich für ein Grafik Tablet der Marke Wacom. Second-Hand sind diverse Tablets dieser Marke schon ab rund 100 Franken erhältlich. Nach einigen knappen und bitteren Niederlagen gegen Mitbieter konnte ich schliesslich ein Wacom Intuos M für knapp 200 Franken ergattern. Dieses war mehr oder weniger ungebraucht. Zum Tablet dazu erhielt ich noch den Stift mit 10 Reserve-Mienen. Die Installierung des Treibers erfolgte problemlos und nach einigen Justierungen konnte die Zeichnerei in Photoshop losgehen.

Das Wacom Intuos Pro M von oben.

Anwendung

Dass man beim Zeichnen nicht auf den Stift, sondern nach vorne auf den Bildschirm schaut ist Anfangs etwas gewöhnungsbedürftig. Mit etwas Übung gewöhnt man sich aber sehr schnell daran. Die Position des Stiftes wird auch erkennt, wenn man die Zeichenfläche noch gar nicht berührt. Das erleichtert das Zeichnen extrem. So kann man mit dem Stift über das Tablet halten und es wird schon angezeigt, wo sich der Cursor bzw. der Stift genau befindet. Berührt man das Tablet mit dem Stift ist dies äquivalent zum Drücken der linken Maustaste.

Mit dem Tablet liesse sich also auch ganz normal der PC bedienen. Ich persönlich brauche das Tablet allerdings ausschliesslich zum Bearbeiten der Bilder in Photoshop. Für andere Programme, wie z.B. Lightroom oder das 3D-Programm Blender habe ich das Tablet nur bedingt gebrauchen können. Hätte ich wahrscheinlich mehr Zeit investiert hätte ich mich vielleicht daran gewöhnt. Für Lightroom und andere Programme benutze ich aber weiterhin die Maus. Auch für Photoshop brauche ich für alles was nicht mit Zeichnen zu tun hat weiter die Maus. Erst wenn es ans Maskieren geht, brauche ich dann das Tablet.

Individualisierung

Das Tablet kann über die Treibersoftware für jedes einzelne Programm unterschiedlich eingestellt werden. Dabei können viele Einstellungen bis ins kleinste Detail angepasst werden. Die Druckempfindlichkeit kann z.B. mit einer Kurve genau seinen Wünschen entsprechend anpassen. Auch können alle Tasten und Gesten für jedes Programm anders eingestellt werden.

Individuelle Tastenbelegung

Auf der linken Seite sind 6 individuell belegbare Tasten angebracht. Diese können für jedes Programm einzeln festgelegt werden und können jede mögliche Funktion übernehmen. Man kann entweder vorgefertigte Funktionen auswählen oder den Tasten eigene Tastenkombinationen zuweisen. Zudem ist ein Drehrad angebracht welches über einen weiteren Knopf vier verschiedene Funktionen hat. Ich habe das Drehrad z.B. auf die Bildrotation, die Pinselgrösse, die Pinselhärte und die Deckkraft eingestellt.

Ausser dem Drehrad benutze ich die Tasten eigentlich nie. Wenn ich in Photoshop ein Bild bearbeite, verwende ich die üblichen Tastenkombinationen auf der Tastatur und für Slider benutze ich die Maus. Denn gerade bei der Einstellung der Pinselgrösse hatte ich mit dem Tablet grosse Schwierigkeiten. Oftmals blieb ich bei der Skalierung hängen was den Workflow wesentlich verlangsamt hatte. Statt nach dem auf- und zu ziehen des Pinsels wieder in den Zeichenmodus zu gelangen, blieb ich auch nach loslassen der zugewiesenen Alt-Taste weiterhin im Skalierungsmodus. Mit der Maus und der normalen Alt-Taste ist mir das aber noch nie passiert.

Die belegbaren Knöpe des Wacom Intuos Pro M.

Gesten

Das Tablet kann das Berühren von Finger oder Stift unterscheiden und bietet auch das Konfigurieren von Gesten an. Tippe ich z.B. zweimal mit dem Finger auf das Tablet öffnet sich die Farbpalette in Photoshop. Dieses Tool hat bei mir aber nicht gut funktioniert und ich habe die Gesten deaktiviert. Ohne die Gesten funktioniert aber die Unterscheidung von Hand und Stift sehr zuverlässig. Anders als bei anderen Grafik Tablets muss man also kein Handschuh tragen.

Die Grössen Large/Medium/Small im Vergleich

Die Grafik Tablets der Serie Intuos Pro kommen jeweils in den Grössen Small, Medium und Large. Die angegebene Fläche bezieht sich auf die Fläche auf welcher aktiv gezeichnet werden.

S: 160 x 100 mm

M: 224 x 148 mm

L: 311 x 216 mm

Für welche Grösse man sich entscheidet ist letztendlich jedem selbst überlassen. Ich habe mich für die mittlere Variante entschieden und bin damit völlig zufrieden. Noch nie hatte ich das Gefühl, das das Tablet zu gross oder zu klein für eine Aufgabe sei.

Wacom Pen

Der Stift liegt sehr gut in der Hand. Am Ende des Stifts ist ein ‘Radiergummi’ welcher wie die Vorderseite bzw. die ‘Miene’ sehr genau erfasst wird und gut funktioniert. Weiter sind am Stift zwei Tasten angebracht. Auch diese können individuell belegt werden. Für mich sind die beiden Tasten etwas leicht auszulösen. Ich habe sie deshalb ebenfalls deaktiviert.

Der Stift funktioniert ohne Strom und muss nicht aufgeladen werden. Zum Aufbewahren ist ein Stifthalter mitgeliefert. Darin sind zudem die Reserve-Mienen untergebracht. So sollte man diese auch nicht verlieren. Die Mienen können schnell und einfach gewechselt werden. Der Verschleiss an Mienen ist aber sehr gering.

Der Wacom Pen.

Die Halterung des Wacom Pen mit den Reserve Mienen.

Allgemeines Urteil und Empfehlung

Das Tablet ist nun bei mir seit gut zwei Jahren in Gebrauch. Besonders am Anfang hatte ich noch grosse Zweifel, ob ich das Tablet wirklich brauchen werde. Erst als ich für 2 Wochen in die Ferien ging merkte ich wie ich mich bereits an das Tablet gewöhnt hatte. Das Maskieren mit der Maus schien mir ewig zu gehen und ich konnte kaum warten, bis ich wieder meine Fotos mit dem Grafik Tablet bearbeiten konnte. Mittlerweile könnte ich mir das Bearbeiten der Fotos ohne Grafik Tablet kaum mehr vorstellen. Selbst in den Ferien nehme ich das Tablet meist mit. Der Workflow hat sich bei mir dadurch wesentlich verbessert. Zum einen geht das Bearbeiten schneller es wird aber auch deutlich genauer.

Offenbar war ich nicht der Einzige, der an seinem Kauf des Tablets gezweifelt hatte. Im Gegenteil zu mir hatten die anderen Käufer wohl keine Fotoreise zur richtigen Zeit und so sind relativ viele Grafik Tablets second-hand zu kaufen.

Die einzigen negativen Punkte am Tablet sind die drahtlose Verbindung und die optische Abnutzung. Die drahtlose Verbindung funktioniert in den allermeisten Fällen Top und bleibt unbemerkt. Bei mir kommt es aber ab und zu vor, dass es zu Rucklern kommt, weil wahrscheinlich die Verbindung zu langsam ist. Dies ist besonders dann der Fall, wenn ich das Tablet erst nach dem Öffnen von Photoshop anschalte. Ich benutze das Tablet mittlerweile meist mit dem mitgelieferten Kabel. So funktioniert das Tablet einwandfrei und ohne bemerkbare Verzögerung. Mittlerweile wurde mein Tablet bereits durch einen gleichnamigen Nachfolger ersetzt. Es ist also gut möglich das dieses Problem behoben wurde.

Der zweite Mängel ist die optische Abnutzung. So zeigt die Oberfläche mittlerweile deutliche Abnutzungspuren. Wieso dies der Fall ist, habe ich bisher nicht herausgefunden. So habe ich die Empfindlichkeit des Tabletts recht hoch und drücke praktisch gar nicht auf die Oberfläche. Auch glaube ich nicht, dass es mit der Abnutzung der Stiftmienen zu tun hat. Die Genauigkeit wird aber durch die Abnutzungspuren nicht beeinträchtigt und so bleibt es dabei zum Glück nur bei einem kleinen ästhetischen Mängel.

Wem würde ich also ein Grafik Tablet empfehlen? Ich denke ein Grafik Tablet macht sicher für jene Sinn welche oft in Photoshop Bilder bearbeiten. Schon mit ein wenig Übung lässt sich der Workflow dadurch deutlich optimieren. Viele Schritte, wie z.B. das Maskieren der Vögel erfolgt mit einem Grafik Tablet wesentlich schneller und einfacher. Die neuste Version des Grafik Tablets ist für ungefähr 400 Franken erhältlich. Auf dem Gebrauchtmarkt sind die Tablets nochmals wesentlich günstiger zu ergattern. Für wen sich für ein neues Tablet interessiert habe ich dieses unten verlinkt. Es lohnt sich sicher aber auch auf Ricardo oder Ebay nachzuschauen.

Wacom Intuos Pro M neu kaufen

Deutschland

International

Die Links sind Affiliate-Links. Wenn du auf einen solchen Affiliate-Link klickst und über diesen Link einen Kauf tätigst, erhalte ich von dem jeweiligen Online-Shop eine Provision. Für dich ändert sich der Preis nicht.

Das könnte dich auch interessieren:

Wacom Intuos Graphics tablet

  • Datum Veröffentlichung: 24.2.2021
  • Titel: Review of a Wacom Intuos Graphics tablet
  • Text Snippet: Two years ago, I bought a Wacom graphics tablet with the aim of improving my workflow. To find out if I'm happy with the tablet and how much I've been able to improve my workflow, check out this article.
  • Foto:
  • erstes Foto:

Wacom Intuos Graphics Tablet Review

With the aim of improving my workflow, I bought a graphics tablet from Wacom last summer. In this article you will find out whether I am satisfied with the tablet and how much I was able to improve my workflow.

Why a graphics tablet?

My workflow for editing images basically consists of two blocks. First, I edit the image globally in Lightroom. For example, I adjust the overall brightness or contrast of the image. For local adjustments, e.g. a certain part of the bird's plumage or the background, I switch to Photoshop. To apply a change only to the background, for example, I have to mask the bird tediously. This is possible with a normal mouse, but with finer feather details the whole thing becomes extremely time-consuming. A graphics tablet is much more efficient and precise here. Thanks to the pressure-sensitive surface, the application of subtle image adjustments is also much more accurate. In practice, this means, for example, that a part of the image becomes darker the harder I press. So I can easily darken light areas in the background or lighten areas that are too dark. A mouse click, on the other hand, always means the same thing. No matter how hard or how soft I click, the area is always darkened to the same extent.

My opinion on the Wacom Intuos M

After reading various reviews on the internet, I decided to buy a graphics tablet from Wacom. Second-hand, various tablets of this brand are available from around 100 Swiss francs. After a few close and bitter defeats against other bidders, I finally managed to get hold of a Wacom Intuos M for just under 200 francs. It was more or less unused. Along with the tablet, I also received the pen with 10 spare pen refills. The driver was installed without any problems and after a few adjustments I could start drawing in Photoshop.

The Wacom Intuos M from a top view perspective.

Using the device

The fact that you don't look at the pen when drawing, but at the front of the screen, takes a little getting used to at first. But with a little practice you get used to it very quickly. The position of the pen is recognised even if you are not yet touching the drawing surface. This makes drawing extremely easy. You can hold the pen over the tablet and it shows you exactly where the pen is. Touching the tablet with the pen is equivalent to pressing the left mouse button.

So the tablet could also be used to operate the PC normally. Personally, however, I only use the tablet to edit pictures in Photoshop. For other programmes, such as Lightroom or the 3D programme Blender, I have only been able to use the tablet to a limited extent. If I had probably invested more time, I might have got used to it. But for Lightroom and other programmes I still use the mouse. For Photoshop, too, I still need the mouse for everything that doesn't have to do with drawing. Only when it comes to masking do I need the tablet.

Customisation

The tablet can be set up differently for each individual programme via the driver software. Many settings can be adjusted down to the smallest detail. The pressure sensitivity, for example, can be adjusted exactly to one's wishes with a curve. All keys and gestures can also be set differently for each programme.

Individual key assignment

There are 6 individually assignable keys on the left side. These can be set individually for each programme and can perform any function. You can either select predefined functions or assign your own key combinations to the keys. There is also a rotary wheel which has four different functions via another button. I have set the rotary wheel, for example, to the image rotation, the brush size, the brush hardness and the opacity.

Apart from the rotary wheel, I never actually use the buttons. When I edit an image in Photoshop, I use the usual keyboard shortcuts and for sliders I use the mouse. This is because I had great difficulties with the tablet, especially when setting the brush size. I often got stuck with the scaling, which slowed down the workflow considerably. Instead of returning to drawing mode after dragging the brush up and down, I remained in scaling mode even after releasing the assigned Alt key. With the mouse and the normal Alt key, however, this has never happened to me.

The six customisable buttons of the Wacom Intuos M.

Gestures

The tablet can distinguish the touch of finger or pen and also offers the configuration of gestures. For example, if I tap twice with my finger on the tablet, the colour palette in Photoshop opens. However, this tool did not work well for me and I deactivated the gestures. Without the gestures, however, the distinction between hand and pen works very reliably. Unlike other graphics tablets, you don't have to wear a glove.

The sizes Large/Medium/Small in comparison

The graphics tablets of the Intuos Pro series come in the sizes Small, Medium and Large. The area indicated refers to the area on which active drawings are made.

S: 160 x 100 mm

M: 224 x 148 mm

L: 311 x 216 mm

Which size you choose is up to you. I decided on the medium version and am completely satisfied with it. I have never had the feeling that the tablet was too big or too small for a task.

Wacom Pen

The pen fits very well in the hand. At the end of the pen is an 'eraser' which, like the front or 'barrel', is very accurate and works well. There are also two buttons on the pen. These can also be assigned individually. For me, the two buttons are a little easy to trigger. I have therefore deactivated them as well.

The pen works without power and does not need to be charged. A pen holder is included for storage. It also contains the spare refills. That way you shouldn't lose them. The refills can be changed quickly and easily. The wear and tear on the refills is very low.

The Wacom Pen

The Base of the Wacom Pen with the other reserve pen tips.

General verdict and recommendation

I have been using the tablet for a good two years now. Especially in the beginning, I was very doubtful whether I would really need the tablet. It wasn't until I went on holiday for 2 weeks that I noticed how I had already got used to the tablet. Masking with the mouse seemed to take forever and I could hardly wait until I could edit my photos with the graphics tablet again. In the meantime, I could hardly imagine editing photos without a graphics tablet. Even on holiday I usually take the tablet with me. The workflow has improved considerably for me. On the one hand, editing is faster, but it is also much more accurate.

Apparently I wasn't the only one who had doubts about buying the tablet. In contrast to me, the other buyers probably didn't have a photo trip at the right time and so there are relatively many graphics tablets to buy second-hand.

The only negative points about the tablet are the wireless connection and the optical wear. The wireless connection works great in most cases and goes unnoticed. For me, however, it happens from time to time that there are jerks because the connection is probably too slow. This is especially the case when I switch on the tablet after opening Photoshop. I now use the tablet mostly with the cable that comes with it. This way, the tablet works perfectly and without any noticeable delay. In the meantime, my tablet has already been replaced by a successor with the same name. So it's quite possible that this problem has been fixed.

The second shortcoming is the optical wear. The surface now shows clear signs of wear. I have not yet found out why this is the case. For example, I have the sensitivity of the tablet quite high and practically don't press on the surface at all. I also don't think it has anything to do with the wear of the pen's mines. However, the accuracy is not affected by the wear marks, so fortunately it remains only a minor aesthetic flaw.

So who would I recommend a graphics tablet to? I think a graphics tablet certainly makes sense for those who often edit images in Photoshop. Even with a little practice, the workflow can be significantly optimised. Many steps, such as masking the birds, are much quicker and easier with a graphics tablet. The latest version of the graphics tablet is available for about 400 Swiss francs. On the second-hand market, the tablets can be bought for much less. For those who are interested in a new tablet, I have linked it below. But it's also worth looking on Ricardo or Ebay.

Buy the Wacom Intuos Pro M new

Germany

International

The links are affiliate links. If you click on such an affiliate link and make a purchase via this link, I will receive a commission from the respective online shop. For you the price does not change.

You might also find interesting:

Verpasse keine neuen Artikel!
Mit dem Abonnieren des Newsletters erklärst du dich automatisch, die Datenschutzrichtlinien zu akzeptieren.

Nicolas Stettler

Weyernweg 27

2560 Nidau

Diese E-Mail-Adresse ist vor Spambots geschützt! Zur Anzeige muss JavaScript eingeschaltet sein.

Soziale Medien


4.10.2023

© 2022 Nicolas Stettler. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED